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Stress Free Parenting Part 3 – How To Cope With The Big and Small Things

Rona was a client I worked with for two years. She has twin girls, who she tried to conceive for four years. As you can imagine, the whole process of trying to get pregnant will create an enormous level of stress for anyone, but for Rona who is the also the Chief Medical Advisor for a big medical practice, it was a particularly great stress.

She sought help only after her husband left her for another woman, when her twin girls were 6 months old. When Rona called me, her twins were 3 years old, and one of them had been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). People with ASD tend to have communication deficit, such as responding inappropriately in conversations, misreading nonverbal interactions, or having difficulty building friendships appropriate to their age. People with ADS can get highly dependent on routines, extremely sensitive to changes in their environment, or intensely focused on odd items. As you can imagine, Rona’s life became a lot more stressful after she found this out.

For those of you unfamiliar, or for those of you who are dealing with a very similar situation, I’ll give you a brief overview of some of the behaviors your child with ADS will exhibit.

In order to be considered ASD, there are two main areas where people must show persistent deficits:

  1. Social communication and social interaction
  2. Restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior

To put this in perspective, the CDC said in 2014, 1 in 68 American children fall on the Autism spectrum – which is a huge increase from previous years. Autism is way more prevalent in boys than girls. While no one really knows why, increased diagnosis and various environmental factors are believed to be part of the uptick.

So Rona asked me to help her come up with some simple strategies to alleviate the overwhelming feelings of stress she was dealing with, and upon further review, I found that these strategies aren’t all that specific to just Rona. Most parents can use these strategies to help them deal with their specific problems and stressful moments.

Here are four strategies that I encourage you to try this week:

  1. Find support from other parents with similar situations. Whether your child is diagnosed with Autism, or you are having trouble conceiving, or you are simply having difficulty finding a compatible nanny or getting your child into a particular school, support is extremely important as one can share information, get advice, and offer an ear of understanding when it comes to personal and professional situations. Knowing you aren’t alone in a situation is proven to reduce feelings of stress and anxiety.
  2. Remember to stop and look after yourself. As parents of children with or without special needs, we often forget to find time for ourselves. Finding 10-20 minutes a day to relax, read a book or paint your nails – something that is completely for yourself – will give you a new energy to be the parent you need to be for your children.
  3. Accept that as a parent you will experience stress, and when you experience stressful situations, remind yourself that it is normal to feel this way. Maybe you can even become creative and call feeling stressed something else? How about, “I am feeling excited!” I tried this a few times, and it would always make me laugh when I labeled my stress in some other way. Instead of defining yourself as the “always stressed out” parent, try to come up with a different way of perceiving yourself, even if it is silly and only serves to make you smile.
  4. Be realistic with the demands you put on yourself. I remember when I went back to work, I thought that I had more time than I actually had; I had very high expectations of myself. I found myself disappointed over and over again. When I changed my expectations and committed myself to complete at least one task a day, I found that I was completing more tasks than expected. Don’t make to do lists a mile long and chastise yourself for not finishing everything. Instead learn to prioritize. What is really important? If you are getting your children fed and to school and they are healthy, does it really matter that you didn’t get to organizing your closet like you had wanted to?

I’ve worked with clients who have dealt with everything from incredibly unique diagnoses to everyday parenting worries, but the common thread is parents of every walk of life feel stressed out from time to time. Reaching out to find specific support and coming up with strategies that you can employ regularly will give you confidence and the ability to work through taxing situations.

Stress Part 2: Start Your Week Stress-Free With This Simple Plan

Last week, I wrote about a few general tools you can use to prevent stress in your daily life. As part of this four-part series, today I’m going to talk specifically about starting off your Monday on the right foot to set the tone for the rest of the week.

For me, Mondays are my most stressful days. When I start to think about why, my head spins. My list is long: I have three kids in two different schools, a husband who has a demanding job, I work as the director of an eating disorder program and am constantly networking in my field, I have a daughter with braces who constantly has appointments, I’m sharing a nanny and it requires a lot of coordination with the other family, I have to buy groceries, I have to organize and clean the apartment, my family lives in Israel so I am constantly making an effort to keep in touch with them as it is ver important to me, and the list goes on and on and on…

Thinking about your own list like this will no doubt make your head spin as well. For you, it might be another day that really seems to be the pinnacle of your stressful week, but I imagine the beginning of the week is stressful for a lot of people. I’ve been thinking about ways I can de-stress at the beginning of the week so I stop dreading Mondays so much and here is the plan I’ve come up with and it seems to be working.

  1. Every Monday I wake up 15 minutes earlier than usual. This means not just setting the alarm earlier but actually getting out of bed a full 15 minutes before I do the rest of the week. Think of it like extra time for your most packed day of the week.
  2. Every Sunday, I plan ahead. I set a reminder for myself every Sunday at 8pm to sit down and plan out my week ahead. I write down all my daughters’ activities, the school functions I need to attend, and the playdates I need to coordinate so it’s all listed out.
  3. I set a reminder to take time on Monday to meditate on what I’m grateful for. If you literally set yourself a reminder to think about gratitude and focus on being present and enjoying every single moment as if it were your last, you’ll approach your to-do list with a totally different perspective. I tell myself I’m healthy, my kids are healthy, my loved ones are healthy and they care about me and my well-being, I love my job and every day I’m doing the best I can. This simple frame of mind helps de-stress me instantly.
  4. I commit to exercising for a minimum of 40 minutes a week. If you think about it, 40 minutes over five days isn’t such a big challenge, but sticking to it keeps me sane. It’s so important to exercise your body and your mind for a few minutes each day.

If you wake up on Mondays feeling overwhelmed, try some of these tactics and see how you feel! Leave me a comment and let me know how you start your week off on the right foot!

A Note To Nannies And Parents About Social Media

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nannies and social media

The other day, I met with a family who wanted me to consult with them on a nanny-related issue.

Marci has been their nanny for the past two years, but they recently started following her on her various social media channels. Now, to be honest, if I wasn’t in the nanny management business and a stranger told me about stalking an employee on social media, I might think it’s over-stepping. BUT since we are talking about someone you are trusting with your most precious possession – your child – in the privacy of your home, I have no problem with social media stalking.

“We noticed that the past month Marci has been partying a lot, which of course is not our business… but we saw on Facebook that while she was at a party she smoked and had some very provocative photos,” this family told me. They also said they noticed a change in Marci’s behavior and that she seemed less involved with their two kids.

When I asked if there was anything else that was bothering them about Marci, they said they also saw a video of her drinking and acting out of control with a few other people.

What would you do if you found this out about your nanny?

We all might answer that question differently, but I am writing this because my goal is to help nannies understand the power social media has on the many aspects of their lives, but particularly their job security when it comes to being a caregiver.

As most young people are aware of these days, it’s not just families who are using social media. Some studies show up to one-third of employers actually use social media to recruit employees. Things like references to marijuana, photos with alcohol and spelling and grammar mistakes in posts are cited as potential red flags, according to recruiting software company Jobvite.

It’s becoming a very common thing for me to have parents tell me about disturbing things they see their nannies do on social media. Another mom called me in panic because her friend saw a picture of her nanny wearing Chanel glasses that were identical to the pair that mom had lost two weeks earlier. I have countless stories about nannies who lost their jobs because they posted horribly negative things about the families they worked for on social media.

My hope is that parents realize their nannies are allowed to have lives outside their job and enjoy social media, but at the same time, I caution nannies to think twice before posting photos or videos of anything that could call into question their character.

When I ask parents why they feel it matters what their nanny is doing on social media, the most frequent answer I get is perception – it’s easy to judge from photos. At the end of the day, parents wants the peace of mind that the person looking after their kids is also a role model for their kids. If a parent’s perception of a nanny is tarnished because of some photos or offensive language on social media, there isn’t much the nanny can do to undo that negative judgment.

Another note to nannies: If you think blocking your social media from strangers or using privacy settings to keep parents from searching you on social media… Think again. I know of a few companies that will crawl through almost every social media site and will be able to access private information. You also have to remember a parent’s network is huge. Just because you don’t think the family you work for is on social media doesn’t mean their friends aren’t.

I write this as a wake-up call to both parents and nannies. Social media has damaged more than a few employer/employee relationships, but when it comes to caregivers, the stakes are so much higher. In certain jobs, partying all the time may have no effect on a person’s job performance. But watching someone’s child will always be different because if a parent loses faith that the person looking after their kids is an upstanding person and always in the right state of mind when with those kids, then the relationship is forever damaged.

If you’re interested in more information about our services as they relate to your nanny, check out our nanny consulting page  or contact us today.

There Is A Genetic Component To ADHD And There Are Things You Can Do About It

With so many children (and adults) affected by ADHD today, I’ve done a lot of research on the subject. As parents, we always want to know if there’s something we could be doing to help with both the symptoms and the causes. This leads to the basic question of whether ADHD is genetic?

The short answer is yes. Something called the human genome project actually mapped out people’s genetic makeups and found a connection between mutations of the MTHFR gene and ADHD. This has led me to do a lot more research on the MTHFR gene and see what can be done once we are aware of this condition – whether it’s in ourselves or in our kids.

First of all, MTHFR stands for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. It’s basically an enzyme that helps break down the folate in our diets into a more useable form. Once in its usable form (5-MTHF), this enzyme is responsible for doing a lot of the basic things that keep our bodies going: cellular functions, synthesis of DNA, production of platelets and red and white blood cells, etc.

Basically, if the MTHFR gene is functioning properly, your body is eliminating toxins and heavy metals from the body. But, if you have a mutation on the gene – some defect – it can lead to everything from headaches and acne to depression and addiction. I found a great blog that breaks down the process in more detail if you are interested in all of the science behind it.

If you think you might have this mutation or want to check for it in your kids, you can order a simple blood test. Now, some will say what’s the point of knowing? Well, there are actually some things you can do about it. While you can’t repair the gene itself, there are ways to treat some of the symptoms.

Diet – and we often hear about this in conjunction with kids’ behavior and ADHD – can play a very important role. Foods containing folate (think leafy greens) become even more important for people with this mutation. Avoiding supplements and processed foods that contain folic acid is also very important.

A lot of this can seem overwhelming at first, but in truth, much of the population suffers from this genetic mutation to some degree. Some research suggests up to 40% of humans have MTHFR gene variations of some kind. The level to which the gene is mutated can vary greatly. Also, if you know you have this mutation, speaking to your doctor while you are pregnant can decrease the risk for your baby.

Overall, I think awareness is key. Talking to your doctor about things like diet and supplements and understanding that there is in fact a genetic component to some of the health and mental issues we face as both kids and adults can go a long way in helping us to avoid self-blame and get the help we need.

Check out our website to view our many professional specialists, or email or call us to chat about connecting you to someone who can help change your and your child’s life for the better.

How Exercise And All Its Positive Effects Can Be The Ultimate Solution For Busy Mothers

After I had my three girls, I went through a period where I felt sad, lonely and exhausted. I just didn’t want to do anything – especially exercise. The only thing I thought I needed was sleep. I was convinced if I could just sleep for a really long time that would solve everything because I felt so overly exhausted.

Then, a friend who is a personal trainer and a dietitian suggested I exercise 30 minutes a day. I had done a little research about exercise and the brain, and it was obvious to me, of course, that exercise affects our body and makes us look and feel better, but I really wanted to learn about what is really going on when we exercise and how exercise could help me with my mental state as well as my physical state. I decided if I was going to start exercising, I wanted to document the progress that I was making so I could see the effects of what I was doing. I knew if I could somehow quantify the evidence within myself, by actually practicing what I had even preached to other people, it would be worth it. So, I made a decision to document my mental state for one week without exercise. I did that after I researched the effects of exercise on the brain and mood. I wanted to understand exactly what hormones are being released when I’m exercising, and I wanted to make sure I was recording the specific things I was feeling before and after I worked out.

I documented my feelings for one week without exercise and realized what I obviously knew – I felt exhausted, my mood was up-and-down and my emotions fluctuated many times throughout the day. Then, the first day I exercised I spent five minutes after writing about how I felt. I did that for one week. By the end of this week of exercise, I realized that by working out for 20 minutes a day my overall mood had improved, my emotions fluctuated a lot less and the endorphins that were released during my exercise were helping me start my days in a much healthier state of mind. My mood fluctuated less and I was less tired even though I woke up 30 minutes earlier to make that extra 20 minutes in my day for exercise.

What am I trying to say here is, of course, we are busy moms and as I’m sure many of you can relate to, we often feel exhausted and like we don’t have time to do anything – especially adding 20 more minutes to our days for exercise. But what I know is that if you really take a break and think about what you have going in a given week, maybe you can find even three days or two days and document how you feel before and after adding a workout in to your routine.

I started this experiment about 10 year ago, and you are probably wondering if I’m still working out for 20 minutes a day. Sadly, the answer is a big NO, but I will tell you that when I do make the time to exercise at least two or three times a week for even 15 minutes, then I do feel the effects. I do feel better and am able to perform at work a lot more efficiently. I can see the positive effects on my social life, relationships and everything else. My point is that if we all at least make an effort to think about our bodies – particularly the connection between the brain and our physical fitness – and to understand why it’s so important for us to exercise and really know all the positive effects, then maybe we’ll make a bigger effort to exercise and to really give it the time of day. I truly believe you can make a huge difference in your life by making such a small change. The beginning of summer is the perfect time to start a new habit that you can take with you through the new season!

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5 Tips For Helping Your Children Overcome Peer Pressure

Peer pressure is something all kids face at one point or another. We know the statistics – our kids are more likely to bully, act out, experiment with things like drugs and alcohol and indulge in self-harm behaviors like eating disorders because of the influence of classmates and peers. The older your child gets, the more dangerous peer pressure becomes. At the same time, it often seems like we have less and less power as parents to protect our kids from other kids. We want to raise strong kids who will arise above that pressure, but how can we really ensure that will happen? How do we teach our kids to be leaders and not followers? To turn to us for guidance instead of getting swayed by the lure of popularity and social standing?

Here are five tips for helping your children overcome peer pressure:

  1. Keep the lines of communication open.

The more you talk to your child, the more you’ll understand what pressures he or she is facing and what is going on at school and outside the home. If our children feel they can turn to us in times of need, they are less likely to turn to other sources. Encourage your child to talk about his or her day on a regular basis. You don’t need to know everything, particularly as your child gets older, but assert yourself as someone willing to listen without judgment. Talk through situations that may not involve your child specifically and point out ways to avoid situations where temptations will be more difficult to avoid.

  1. Teach your child self-confidence.

This is huge and begins from an extremely early age. Instilling confidence in your child will set him or her up for the rest of life. How do you do this? First, make sure you are emphasizing positive body image. This means not criticizing your child’s eating habits or making comments about weight. This also means not making comments about your own weight or emphasizing appearances over what is really important. Compliments and praise should be handed out frequently – when the situation warrants it, of course. Celebrate your child’s uniqueness in every way. Show your pride and teach your child to feel pride for accomplishments and a job well done.

  1. Reinforce positive values.

Make sure your children know where you stand on important issues. Point out instances of honesty, standing up for someone getting picked on and choosing the path less taken. As parents, it’s our job to model the type of behavior we expect. Set clear and strict rules when it comes to things like drugs and alcohol, and most importantly, explain your reasoning for those rules.

  1. Monitor your child’s friends.

This doesn’t mean spy on your children or take away all their privacy, but you should feel comfortable around your children’s friends and their parents. Encourage socializing at your house. Leave them alone to have their time, but also keep a watchful eye on the types of behavior and language that is used. Don’t tear your children’s peers down, but if you see behavior you don’t like, it’s a good idea to discuss this with your children in a non-threatening way. If the behavior is truly harmful, then of course, you can take the necessary precautions to limit your child’s interaction with that person.

  1. Encourage your child to get involved.

This goes back to self-confidence, but the more involved and part of the community someone is, the less that person will feel the need to take extra steps to fit in. Don’t force your child to engage in clubs and sports if he or she isn’t interested, but stress the importance of being involved in something or finding a hobby that is fulfilling and then being proud of that activity or hobby. Being a part of a team can do wonders for a child’s self-esteem. A sense of belonging truly helps children overcome peer pressure from other sources.

Do you have any other tips? I’d love to hear!

So Many Of Our Children’s Problems Can Be Solved With More Sleep

One of the biggest problems plaguing children today is a lack of sleep. Once children enter middle school and go on in until high school, they are usually involved with social activities, involvement in sports and other clubs and also dealing with a great deal of homework.

The National Sleep Foundation recommends children ages 6-13 get between 9 and 11 hours of sleep a night. Teenagers should get between 8 and 10. So many studies have found that school children do not get enough sleep at night, and the consequences affect everything from their school work and athletic performance to their overall health and well-being.

For one, not getting enough sleep has been proven to lead to things like unhealthy eating habits. A lack of sleep can cause acne, as well, at a time when teens are already experiencing a surge of hormones. Things like forgetting facts and things they’ve studied can lead to poor performance on tests and increased anxiety. Poor sleeping patterns can even contribute to things like ADD/ADHD.

The truth is, though, that sometimes making sure your child gets enough sleep is very difficult. Particularly if your child suffers from anxiety over social issues or school work, sleep can be hard for some. Busy schedules and packed weekdays can cause our kids to struggle to get everything done – craving a bit of downtime before they fall asleep at night.

It’s important to stress how vital sleep is with your kids. Make sure your kids understand the need for a routine, even as they grow older and start handling more responsibilities. Things like caffeine and too much sugar can alter children’s sleep schedules. Also, making sure your kids stick to a routine is helpful for making sure they are getting the recommended amount of sleep. Encouraging your kids to shut off all electronics at LEAST an hour before bedtime will help them fall asleep easier.

I find it’s helpful to recognize signs of lack of sleep with your kids. If your kids are acting out or seemingly more irritable than usual, if you are having big blow ups at night over homework or tears about little things or if you notice your child is starting to struggle in a subject that once seemed manageable, pay close attention to how many hours of sleep your kids are actually getting at night. Sometimes, things might need to be eliminated from a schedule. If too many sports and activities are causing exhaustion, it might be time to cut back. At the same time, help your child understand that sleep is not a punishment. It’s simply something that keeps their bodies and minds functioning at full capacity, especially at a time when their bodies are growing and changing so rapidly.

If you would like me to connect you with one of our expert therapists contact me or book an appointment with me. I look forward to hearing from you!

The Importance Of Seeking A Nanny Before You Give Birth

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When you are pregnant with your first child, there are so many things to think about and people are constantly giving you advice. It can be such an exciting and overwhelming time! One thing I recommend to all new parents, though, is really taking the time to search for a nanny prior to giving birth. I’ve seen many parents wait until their child is born, thinking they will have plenty of time in those first few weeks to really search for someone. Here are five reasons to consider finding a nanny while you are still pregnant.

  1. It gives you time to really do your research before you are stressed out with a newborn. While those first few weeks are magical, they are also exhausting. The last thing you are going to feel like doing on such little sleep is looking through resumes and talking to references.
  2. You won’t make a decision based out of fear of doing it alone or having to find someone in a rush before you go back to work. If you are in a hurry or getting worried about having no help, you might make your decision based off fear or desperation. You want to have all the time you need to find someone who is perfect — not just okay for the time being. The more time you give yourself, the more relaxed and thorough you can really be in the process.
  3. You will have plenty of time to get to know the person before leaving her with your new baby. It’s very tough to leave your baby with anyone, but especially someone you feel like is a stranger. If you hire someone way ahead of time, you can get to know the nanny in the weeks before the birth and then after the birth, as well. You want to feel very comfortable with the person before you have no option but to leave your child with a childcare provider.
  4. You can really focus on the type of parenting philosophy and type of nanny care you want your child to have. While you are pregnant, it is the perfect time to have discussions with your partner as well as focus on awareness just by yourself. You can think clearly about the type of parent you want to be, the type of childhood you want your baby to have and the type of person you think will be an asset to your family. If you wait until after the baby is born, a lot of time you are thinking more about immediate needs and not the big picture. It can get easy to get hung up on someone who can start right away and completely forget about finding that ideal person who will make your family life better in the long run.
  5. You will have plenty of time to train your nanny once the baby is born and she can get to know you and your routine before you absolutely need her. I think it’s a great idea to have your nanny start to get to know you and your baby before you are ready to leave her with your child full-time. The earlier you hire someone, the more likely it is that you’ll have plenty of time to train her and get acclimated to your home and family.
 If you’re interested in more information about our services as they relate to your nanny, check out our nanny consulting page or contact us today.

Parenting Tools: Love and Logic And Counting To Three

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I’ve talked briefly about Love and Logic parenting because I think it’s a great philosophy, and I’ve seen it work. I want to equip parents with as many tools as possible, because as we know, being a mom and dad does not come with a guide. There is a great book that I highly recommend called 1-2-3 Magic by Thomas W Phelan.

The book talks about practical strategies to help give your kids choices and also set appropriate boundaries – without yelling. I think one thing most parents say before they have kids is that they don’t want to be the type of parent who is always screaming at their kids. But, as we all know, once you become a parent and you are faced with the day-to-day stress and the task of teaching your child responsibility, it is so easy to resort to yelling. The thing is, though, that only creates more stress and hinders our children, who don’t respond well to anger.

The idea of Love and Logic parenting is to be very clear with your kids about their choices and the consequences. Make your rules make sense to them. The key here is that you have to follow through. Empty threats are the worse because they teach your children nothing and make you upset and angry. Instead, tell your children what you expect, why you expect it and what will happen if those things aren’t done. Then, simply follow through with a consequence that makes sense.

For example, we were having trouble getting my youngest child to brush her teeth before going to bed. At some point, it needs to become the child’s responsibility. So, one day, I decided to stop the nighttime struggle and presented her with this scenario. I said, “They are your teeth and therefore it is your responsibility to brush them. I’m not going to do it for you. However, as a parent, I have to protect you from getting cavities. That’s part of my job to keep you healthy. So, if you don’t brush your teeth then you won’t be able to eat any of the sugary treats or candy that you like because that is what is most likely to cause cavities.”

This blog talks more about Love and Logic parenting as well as using the “1-2-3 strategy.” The idea with counting is that you are giving your child a formal warning and time to focus on what the consequence will be for a certain behavior. After three, you need to take action and follow through with a consequence.

What other strategies do you use that you’ve seen are effective? I’d love to hear your feedback!

Here’s How Letting Go Of Guilt Will Make You Happier

As moms, we often feel guilty about one thing or another.

When I wanted to continue my education after having my first child, I felt guilty for leaving my kids at home with a nanny. When I started working, I felt guilty for not spending enough time with my three girls. When my 11-month-old fell and had a concussion while my nanny decided to watch TV in our bedroom, I blamed myself for being selfish and putting myself first before my children.

When we ordered in food for dinner when I felt exhausted and depressed because taking care of three kids is extremely exhausting (and yes rewarding too…) I blamed myself for being a bad mom who couldn’t even make dinner for her family. I even went on to tell myself, “What would my mom think of that?” and I came up with a whole story in my head of how horrible I was because I wasn’t a full-time stay at home mom.

There are many reasons why I thought the topic of mom’s guilt and self-blame is a good topic for Mother’s Day. After I met with a mom client who was depressed and heard what she had to say about being a mom, I was convinced that this was the perfect topic to write about.

Silvia is a mom of two boys whose dream is to be able to return to work as an interior decorator. She did that for 10 years prior to having her first child, and she tried working on a few projects after having kids but her boys and her husband weren’t happy that she wasn’t home. Her guilt and self-hatred for leaving her boys with a nanny made her decide that she would not work until her boys were older. When I asked Silvia how she felt about being a stay at home mom she said, “I feel like the days just go by and I am not doing anything meaningful. All my friends work and have careers and I am one of the only 40 years old I know that does nothing. I feel like I am nothing.”
I was very sad to hear Silvia telling herself all these negative things about being a mom. I explained to Silvia how her negative talk affects how she feels and why she behaves in ways that she wants to change (sleeping a lot, bingeing and not engaging with her boys and husband).

I asked Silvia what she wanted to do and she was certain that she wanted to stay home with her boys, ages 3 and 6, for at least two more years before she was going to go back to work.I also asked Silvia to tell herself that and be secure with how she says it to herself and others.

Silvia said, “I am a proud stay at home mom and the CEO of the Klien Family.” We both laughed and Silvia’s homework for the week was to pay attention to what she was telling herself and write it down. Guilt and self-blame are very popular with moms, and once you let go of them, you enjoy motherhood a lot more.

I found a great article that talks about dealing with the guilt we have as mothers and actually paints guilt in a positive light. We can use our guilt to channel it into making changes and actually get us to do something about the feelings tugging on our conscience. However, as the article goes on to say, most of us use our guilt in negative ways and allow it to take over our lives.

I think the most important thing is that moms understand they are in control of what they are telling themselves. Guilt and blame result from moms telling themselves all kinds of stories. Even if the stories are right, we can use the feelings of guilt and self-blame as a motivator to help us change the story.

I’ve found it is SO important for moms to use each other as a support system. Talking about your feelings of guilt surrounding motherhood helps you to realize you aren’t alone. Comparing yourself to other women, on the other hand, will just breed those negative feelings. I’d love to hear about the kind of guilt you often feel as a mom! We can use my Facebook page or the comments section here to start the conversation!

Here are just a few things I hear moms blame themselves for:

Being tired

Needing “me” time

Not being able to be two places at once

Having to work

Not being able to always spend equal time with each child

Not being as “fun” as other moms

Forgetting things — it happens

Letting someone else handle the meals

Getting frustrated

LW Wellness Network provides emotional and mental help for those who are struggling from stress or depressions, don’t hesitate to ask. Contact us today for a free consultation.