Top 5 Reasons Why You Need A Life Coach

Has the thought, “I need a life coach” ever crossed your mind? Are you not sure you need one, but you are feeling like you need help of some kind? Maybe someone recommended that you get a life coach, but you are skeptical? Before you write the idea off, let’s first talk about what a life coach is.

A life coach, also called a personal development coach, is someone who counsels clients on anything from career obstacles to personal challenges. But a life coach isn’t just anyone off the street. Personal life coaches are certified professionals whose job it is to equip you with the tools you need to succeed in whatever areas in which you are struggling. The International Coach Federation (IFC) is an organization dedicated to the advancement of coaching throughout the world. It is a highly respected organization that certifies life coaches. The organization is dedicated to making coaching “an integral part of society.” While it is not the only certification program for life coaches, it is one of the most reputable. The takeaway, though, is that coaching has rapidly evolved into a structured, nuanced profession, and the people who go through the certification process are highly trained and qualified. It’s a profession that is regulated so you can look up a potential coach’s qualifications, as well.

At the end of the day, asking for help and leaning on the support of professionals is a true sign of strength, not weakness. In fact, there are a lot of reputable organizations who make use of some form of “coaching” for their team members. The Chartered Institute of Personnel Development (CIPD) did a study in 2009 of the professional coaching industry. Of the organizations surveyed, 90% reported using coaching. What’s even more interesting is that even as the economy took a hit, 70% reported continuing and even increasing their investment in coaching for their teams — proving many businesses feel like their ROI for coaching is high. Many professional sports teams also use a form of coaching off the field. Teams often hire coaches for leadership and character development for their players. So if all these large organizations are using coaching, why not try it on a personal level for your own unique needs?

If you are doing some soul searching and feeling like you need a little help, consider these five reasons on why you should find a personal life coach.

# 1 Get selfish

It’s time to think about yourself! Yes, you read that right. When we think about the word “selfish,” it usually brings up negative connotations, but the truth is, being selfish can sometimes be very productive and healing. When’s the last time you paused to ask yourself what you need? Your list of needs can include everything from material needs to physical needs to mental and spiritual wellness and fulfillment. Working with a life coach will give you the space to first and foremost figure out what those needs are, and then to form a plan to figure out how those needs can be met. It’s easy to say you are going to set aside time for yourself to meditate, journal, or come up with a list of goals. However, the reality is that we often put ourselves last on our to-do lists. A coach will give you the freedom and the time to put yourself first and then hold you accountable to your goals, while offering guidance and support. If you think investing in your own personal happiness is selfish, then it’s important to stop thinking about being selfish as a bad thing.

#2 Get happy.

You can lead a happier, more fulfilled life. This seems like a cliché, but all too often, people give up on their own happiness and settle for less. Everyone tells you it’s true, and it is, but you have to make time for it! We know that as humans, we like to be working toward something — to be moving forward in life. We also know that as humans, we crave happiness, even if we can’t define what that means in our lives.The study of happiness — how to get it, what factors play the biggest role, how to measure it — has actually become an area scientists and researchers are studying more and more. Why? Because it’s kind of like a universal goal. If you think the pursuit of happiness is a waste of time, there is science that would disagree with you. A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that certain types of happiness can actually have an effect on our genes, specifically antibody and antiviral genes. A Finnish study used body maps to show how emotion is expressed throughout the body, and happiness was the one emotion shown to activate every part of the body from the head down to the feet. Other interesting research reveals that age also plays a factor in determining what makes one happy. As we change, sometimes we need help discovering how to get back on our own personal path toward a life that brings us joy.

A life coach is there to guide you on your personal journey toward happiness — at whatever age or crossroads you find yourself. To use a sports metaphor: “You are the player in this relationship, and it is the coach’s job to help you succeed in the game.” So, if you’re feeling like you are missing out on joy in life, a coach can teach you the fundamentals to take your fulfillment to the next level. Stop and think for a moment about your own happiness. Have you lost sight of what makes you happy? Or do you feel like you are in rut? Are your days comprised of going through the same monotonous motions? Professional athletes invest so much into their physical abilities. Perhaps it’s time you started treating your life like the ultimate game. Isn’t your life worth investing in?

# 3 Get unstuck

According to the current edition of The Conference Board Job Satisfaction survey, less than half of US workers report job satisfaction.

“In 2013, the percentage of workers satisfied with their jobs was 47.7, well below the historical level of 61.1 percent in 1987. Increasing by a mere 0.4 percentage points from the previous year, overall job satisfaction continues to improve from its lowest point (42.6 percent in 2010), albeit at a disappointingly slow pace.” -The Conference Board

Considering how much of our lives are spent at work — and the fact that we depend on jobs for our income — it’s discouraging how many of us feel like we are at a roadblock. You don’t have to accept job dissatisfaction. When you feel like you’ve done everything in your power to achieve your career goals, a coach can offer up new and different strategies to get you on a track that makes you feel both challenged and accomplished. It’s easier to believe that nothing will ever change, but if you feel like you are wasting your days — STOP! You don’t have to figure out everything alone.

#4 Get through major changes

Facing life transitions is difficult on your own. Change is hard. That’s just a fact. At different points in our lives we all face life transitions, which can result in feeling lost, confused, sad and even depressed. These feelings can cloud our judgements and affect other areas of our lives, particularly our relationships. Working with a coach who is able to offer an outside perspective will help you organize your thoughts and feelings, as well as provide a consistent voice in the face of chaotic changes. Life changes can happen at any time. Whether you are transitioning from school to employment, changing careers, going into or getting out of a relationship, starting a family, moving, or going through any other life-changing event, it can feel like your entire life is spiraling out of control. Even small transitions, like a promotion at work, can cause other areas of your life to seem confusing. It’s normal to crave stability, but it’s also not practical to think that everything will always be stable. It is ok to ask for help when you find yourself attempting to navigate the uncertain waters of life.

#5 Get the vital tools you need

You may not currently have the skills you need to execute your plan or get to the next level. Some people have very specific ideas and goals for their life, but they feel like they aren’t attainable. A coach can equip you with new skills that will allow you to do more and reach your full potential — whether that’s in your relationships, your job or your mental well-being. You are already creative. You are already whole. You are already resourceful. You might just need to harness a few things to be able to put everything together to rise above your current situation. Think about all the things we learned as toddlers and young children. We learned so much every day and progressed at such a rapid rate in everything from motor skills to emotional intelligence. At some point, that learning curve plateaus, but does it have to stop? The answer is no. A coach is a resource that will allow you to keep growing, keep learning and continue to acquire new skills. We’d never tell a child who just mastered crawling that there was no need to learn to walk. Don’t cut your potential short by not taking the time to see how you can grow with more guidance.

A life coach means you have someone “in your corner” at all times — someone who will listen (and truly hear you), educate (and not judge you) and see you (while viewing you at your highest self)! Whether or not you believe it, you can absolutely be your best self, and a personal development coach is a great way to help you get there. A life coach is an adviser, friend, confidant, consultant, navigator and facilitator. They are trained in this, so why not let them help you reach your highest self? Get happier, more free and more on task to achieving your goals.

If you’re thinking, “Yes, I already have friends and family members who are always in my corner,” that’s great — but often that might not be enough. Our loved ones are vital components to our everyday lives and our happiness, but it’s impossible for them to offer a completely objective perspective because they know us on such a personal level. It’s also not fair to treat our family and friends as though they are paid professionals. They are also trying to navigate life and haven’t studied or been trained in how to dole out advice and guidance. So while building and nurturing personal relationships is always a great thing, a life coach is a unique relationship, one that cannot be duplicated by an already existing friendship.

Yes, a life coach is an investment, as they aren’t free, but consider how much your happiness is worth. It’s just as important to take care of our mental well-being as our physical well-being. This is not a short-term investment, either. The whole idea behind life coaching is that the benefits will last a lifetime. Factoring in your long-term mental health, how much are you willing to spend to get back on track?

Are you ready to step into a life of choice?

Have you ever thought, ““I need a personal life coach?”

Are you ready to nurture your personal self?

It’s time to take the leap!

If you would like me to connect you with one of our expert therapists or dietitians, please contact me. I look forward to hearing from you!

Advice from an NYC Sports Psychologist

How To Deal With Your Competitive Anxiety: Everyday Advice from an NYC Sports Psychologist

 

“The ball’s in your court, now.”

“She really hit it out of the park!”

“He’s down for the count today.”

“Help us score one for the team.”

“Don’t drop the ball on this one.”

“We’re down to the wire!”

 

Sports metaphors are everywhere. In business, in the classroom, in the movies, in finance, in our day-to-day life. Lots of us don’t play a sport anymore, or never even did, but the competitive anxieties still remain in our modern life, well beyond the field or court. We judge and compare ourselves to others, whether it’s through a co-worker’s career advancement or a traveling friend’s Instagram account.

Competitive anxiety is real. It’s so hard in today’s fast-paced world not to feel like we aren’t performing at a high enough rate, or like we aren’t falling behind the group. We want to keep up, and sometimes it feels like we’re drowning. Everywhere we look, we are asked to be “better versions of ourselves,” which can be a good thing, but it can also cause a whole lot of stress.

One of our providers, Dr. Itzik, a Mental Performance Consultant, frequently deals with competitive anxiety with his clients. Itzik teaches athletes and high-performing individuals of all ages and backgrounds strategies to break down barriers and achieve great performance. He is a Sports, Health and Exercise Science professional who specializes in the mental and physiological elements associated with peak performance. He “believes that educating people on how to be mindful of their emotions and how to manage and channel them during a peak performance environment is a key factor in performance enhancement.” Sounds like this could be helpful in our day-to-day experiences, too, right?

What Is A Sports Psychologist?

But first, what do sports psychologists do? Well, that’s a pretty general question with a pretty all-over-the-place answer. They may be a trainer, a consultant, or a therapist/counselor/psychologist. They might work with career transitions. Or with eating disorders. They can help with team building, team dynamics, and group leadership. They can work with rehabilitation after an injury, or the psychological impact of an injury. They might work in research or as a service provider.

All this to say… they don’t just work with professional athletes.

According to the American Psychological Association (APA), “The same strategies that sport psychologists teach athletes — relaxation techniques, mental rehearsals and cognitive restructuring, for example — are also useful in the workplace and other settings.”

Athletes also use a psychologist to help them with concentration, goal-setting, controlling their temper, communication with teammates, keeping up an exercise program, motivation, and working with a team.

They’re awesome, is what we’re trying to say. They’re really awesome. For you, for me, for Lebron… we can be lumped into the same sentence as him, right?

It’s a relatively new field. The man regarded as the “Father of Sports Psychology,” Coleman Griffith, only starting research in the field around 1925. He first was an educational psychology professor at the University of Illinois, where he broke barriers by conducting research on athletic competition and how it related to psychology. Eventually, he was hired as the sports psychologist for the Chicago Cubs. The Cubs went to the World Series the following year, but Griffith was still distrusted by many, and often not listened to by various employees of the team and in the professional sports world. They fired him the year after. If only he could see where sports psychology is today!

In under 100 years, Sports Psychology has gone from being poo-pooed by professionals to being utilized in top competitive environments, such as the Olympics. Why the drastic change? Well, psychology in general has gained much respect in the past century. More people view therapy as an important part of life now than ever before, and it’s finally being recognized in the performance sector, as well. A wider swath of people are beginning to realize that our heads and brains are just as much a part of our bodies as the rest of us… who woulda thunk?!

It’s still hard to categorize performance related to the brain, though. Athletes can see visible physical results from training with a fitness coach. They can feel when their injuries are healing after many sessions with a physical therapist. But what they can’t see or feel directly, and what they cannot see on a gameday chart, is mental work. They can’t literally see any progress from countless therapy sessions. This makes the importance of sports psychology more difficult for some to grasp, because we can’t view immediate tangible results.

Alas. People rejecting therapy. Brushing aside anything having to do with **gasp** THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS. Well, we know it’s helpful, so that’s a start, I suppose!

Anyway, onto the fun stuff from the pro!

Itzik’s Work

Dr. Itzik

Mental Performance Consultant

Member of the American Psychological Association

LWWellness Provider

As a former fighter in the Special Forces unit of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF), Itzik was drawn to learn more about the individual and team dynamics that affect performance. He has extensive hands-on experience working with top-notch athletes, military personnel, and business clientele from a diversity of backgrounds, cultures, and ages. He has also worked with athletes from the U.S. Olympic team, U.S. Karate team, and the Israeli National Judo team.

Below is some advice from Itzik to help you with team dynamics and competitive anxiety. Enjoy!

We all know that technical and physical skills are important in sports, but there is also a mental aspect that is just as crucial. Technical and physical skills are the foundation of performance, but mental ability is what shifts, shakes, or empowers that foundation.

As sports psychology professionals, we utilize a set of tools to improve an athlete’s performance: mental skills training, assessments, regular sessions, biofeedback, emotion regulation, among others.

Some common cases we see are clients who experience challenges with either Competitive Anxiety or Team Dynamics. Below, we’ll give a brief overview of what these challenges may look like and how they can be addressed.

Competitive Anxiety

Let’s talk about something that many people have experienced: Competitive Anxiety.

One thing I often experience is clients who come in and perform really well in practice but fail to deliver during competition. It can be due to fear of being criticized or their inability to manage emotions. There can be many factors that affect an individual’s ability to perform well under pressure.

So, in this situation, we perform an assessment where we try to identify the true, underlying cause of what is affecting their ability to compete or play to their full potential. The experience of not being able to perform on the field as well as in practice can be extremely frustrating and confusing. People just don’t know what to do, and they often can’t see a way to fix it. They’ve tried many different things over and over again, but with no result.

Many times, I see these kids after they have exhausted all other possibilities and methods. In this case, we first have to identify the problem and then start work on targeting that issue (or issues) which can include anything from mental skills to managing emotions. We have many tools available to address this issue, but they must be tuned to the individual. Usually clients begin to notice changes in their ability/behavior after a couple of months of therapy.

These kids, and the people around them, are going through this experience together. It is not an isolated incident, but it is one that affects everyone within that circle. It can almost become a vicious cycle of frustration, confusion, and fear.

Team Dynamic

The second most common includes challenges with the Team Dynamic.

In team sports, the athletes must (of course) deal with their own challenges, but they must also deal with being part of a team. The first requires overcoming challenges individually, and the other demands overcoming challenges as a team and collaboratively. One could say that our work could be divided into two parts: helping an entire team by improving their cohesiveness and communication, and helping individuals to address their personal struggles. This could include anything from miscommunication with coaches, fears of inferiority, or challenges with sub-groups or ‘cliques’. I help these individuals to identify their specific challenges and provide them with the tools needed to become an active part of the team, while navigating and managing these problems in a positive way. Sometimes, these individuals are already very good players with plenty of potential, but the only thing that’s holding them back is their social environment. They go to practice and put in the work, but they don’t get along with their teammates and often feel isolated. There can be many small things that affect the individual and team dynamic.  

..And?

Alright, so you’ve read the stuff. But how can this help you in your intramural league? In the office? In your family relationships?

Here are some basic tools that sports psychologists use with their clients to help them with anxiety related to competition or performance. You might be surprised by how seeing a psychologist can help you.

Focus On What You Can Control

What is in your control? Practicing. Eating well. Getting enough sleep. Being as prepared as possible. What is out of your control? What other people think. How other people do in life. What other people say. Who wins or loses. What you cannot control is impossible to control — I repeat, IMPOSSIBLE! — so take this off your plate. Set your mind on what you can control, instead.

Practice Self-Confidence

Instead of focusing on past failures, focus on past successes. What brought you here today that put you in this competitive position? There are things in life that you did well to get you here in the first place. The more you prepare, the more confident you will be, because at least you won’t be worried about not having done the work.

Set Goals

Set very specific goals that you know you can accomplish. “Having two kids by the time I’m 35” is not an example of something you know you can accomplish. “Exercising for 30 minutes of every day for two weeks” is.

Practice Relaxation

What relaxes you? Is it aromatherapy? A bath? A run? Specific breathing techniques? Start to narrow down the things that give you relaxation (hint: it usually has to do with the mind and body together), and use them leading up to the event.

Find Distraction

It’s ok to distract yourself before a competition if it helps you with your anxiety. You can read a book, talk with coworkers, listen to music, stretch — find something that works for you!

Visualization

This is also known as imagery or mental rehearsal. Imagine each moment of your event, including physical movements. Try to imagine it from your own perspective (not someone watching you), and at the speed in which you will actually do it. Make it as real as possible in your mind and do it step by step.

How Can A Certified Psychologist Help Me?

Think you might be interested in working with a sports psychologist? It bears repeating here that you don’t need to be an athlete to work with one. You don’t have to be anything special to work with one. (Although you are special, I promise.)

When choosing a psychologist of any kind, it’s important to know what you’re looking for. A therapist or psychologist should specialize in whatever you need. The best psychologist for you might be a local psychologist — ask for psychologist recommendations and do your research.

Looking For A Psychologist Around Me

  • Do an online psychologist search to find a psychologist locator/psychologist lookup tool.
  • Look up your options in a psychologist directory for a licensed psychologist in the area.
  • Ask a psychologist office! Many can point you towards a good psychologist/psychotherapist.

Psychologist Vs. Therapist

What is the difference between a therapist and psychologist? Well, both strive to improve people’s lives. And after that, it gets a little murky. One main difference is that psychologists have advanced degrees (often PhDs) in psychology, whereas therapists can have any number of degrees in specific disciplines, such as social work, family counseling, or substance abuse. A psychologist is a social scientist, often having dealt with research or clinical settings, who is trained to study mental process and human behavior. A psychologist and psychiatrist often work together. A therapist is a broader umbrella that many fields fit into, including psychologists.

Alright, there you have it! Sports Psychology in a nutshell. Many thanks to Itzik for his words of wisdom! All this talk about healthy competition almost makes us want to join a soccer league… almost.

If you would like me to connect you with one of our expert therapists or dietitians, please contact me. I look forward to hearing from you!

Overcoming Fear: Dealing With Anxiety

5 Actions to Take When Anxiety Is Near

 

Action # 1 : Normalize Your Feelings

The first and most important thing to do when experiencing anxiety is not to freak out and let it overcome you — this is easier said than done. However, a good first step is to tell yourself that it is normal to experience anxiety. Sometimes, letting yourself feel anxious is the best thing that you can do to help yourself overcome it. Before I continue, I want to convince you that anxiety can be a positive and constructive thing. (Yes! You read that right…don’t worry — I’ll explain more, so keep reading.)

Anxiety is a feeling characterized by intense fear, worry, and apprehension. So far, all of this sounds negative, scary, and overwhelming — and it can be. When you feel anxiety, it is expressed not just emotionally, but also physically. For many, this can be debilitating. These symptoms are typical for millions of people who are diagnosed with an anxiety disorder, including panic disorder. In the DSM 5 (considered the bible of psychology) there are 12 types of anxiety disorders. I will not include them all, but will briefly mention the criteria that is required to be diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD).

Before you tell yourself that you have a “disorder,” you might find it helpful to know that, in order to be diagnosed with a psychological disorder, you have to experience the following symptoms for a certain amount of time. Of course, you will need a professional to help with the diagnosis, but I am including this here so you can understand that what you are experiencing might not necessarily be a disorder, but rather a feeling that many experience. If you allow yourself to experience the anxiety, it may actually dissipate.

When should I seek a professional depression and anxiety therapist near me?

  • You experience excessive anxiety more days than not about several topics, events, or activities for at least 6 months.
  • The anxiety and worry that you experience is accompanied by seeking reassurance from others.
  • The anxiety can be related to work, health, financial matters, or other life circumstances.
  • The anxiety and worry are associated with at least THREE of the following symptoms:
  1.  Edginess or restlessness
  2. Tiring easily; more fatigue than usual
  3. Difficulty concentrating
  4. Irritability
  5. Increased muscle aches or soreness
  6. Difficulty sleeping

It is important to note that one can be diagnosed with GAD only if his disorder is not better diagnosed as a different disorder. Also, GAD cannot be diagnosed if the individual is abusing medication or alcohol.

Action #2 : Practice Mindfulness

Before you go any further, I challenge you to try the following exercise. Read the following instructions, and then pause for 60 seconds while completing the task:

  • Look at the palm of your hand.
  • Focus on your breath while looking at the palm of your hand.
  • When you feel that your thoughts are distracted by the many things you have to do (or whatever else you might be thinking about) gently bring your thoughts back to the palm of your hand.
  • DON’T judge yourself for being distracted. Simply notice the distraction, and bring your attention back to your hand.

How was this experience for you? (If you didn’t actually take 60 seconds to do this, please do it now…:-) )

I must say that when I first tried this exercise, it was extremely challenging for me. When I was first asked to do it in school, I found it difficult to focus my full attention on staring at the palm of my hand. (Who has time to do that?) Besides the fact that I had never actually looked at the palm of my hand or realized how many lines existed (kind of fascinating, no?), I was surprised to find out how challenging it was for me to just be mindful and quiet my mind for five very long minutes.

So, before I continue, it might be helpful for me to define mindfulness in a very simple way: Mindfulness is a state of active, open attention on the present moment without judging your thoughts and feelings. Instead of letting your life pass by, mindfulness means that you are living in the moment with full awareness of your current experience, rather than dwelling on the past or anticipating the future.

Many people practice mindfulness meditation to help with the reduction of stress and anxiety. There is a lot of evidence about the effectiveness of mindfulness, but I will include some studies that may convince you to be curious about mindfulness if you are not already familiar with it. My wish for you is that by the time you finish reading this section, you will have practiced at least 60 seconds of mindfulness exercise.

Can you think about the last time you experienced anxiety? What was the anxiety about? What was your first instinct to do when you felt it?

I have worked with many clients who, for a variety of reasons, are terrified of being anxious. We will all experience anxiety at some point in our lives. When we think about the word anxiety, we are most likely to associate the word with something negative that we must remove from our lives. While anxiety can create challenges for many people, it is important to also remember that anxiety serves a purpose to help and protects us in certain situations.

Action # 3 : Write Down Your Thoughts and Feelings

If I told you that writing down your thoughts and feelings would reduce your anxiety, would you at least try it? Many studies have shown that writing down your fears eases overall stress, and helps you perform better in life’s stressful situations.

A University of Chicago study that was published in the journal Science found that test takers who wrote down their worries before the test had higher scores than students who did not write down their anxieties and fears before taking the test. The researchers concluded that identifying and getting out all of their concerns helped to ease tension, and allowed them to free up brain power for more important things, like actually responding to the questions on the test!

Writing in a journal every day or two is a great way to release some of your tension. Write about happy things, as well — write about whatever you want! The important thing is to write. You may be happy to have those journals years down the road. Or, if you’re worried about leaving a paper trail, write things down and recycle the paper — it doesn’t have to be a precious keepsake! The point is, write down what’s bothering you, what scares you, what makes you nervous, and then move onto more important life things! Stop letting it take up space in your brain.

Action # 4 : Know That You Are 100% In Charge Of Your Thoughts And Feelings

This one took me a long time to actually understand, believe, and practice! Once I understood that I had the power to control my thoughts, though, my life changed and I was much happier. Let’s assume that you are reading this and believe that you INDEED have the power to change your thoughts and feelings. First, can you acknowledge how awesome it would be if you could have full control over your thoughts and feelings? So? What would you actually do with that? Understanding/awareness is only the first step towards achieving the desirable behavior (=reduction in anxiety). Basically, some event happens and you tell yourself something that it is causing you to feel/experience anxiety.

I am going to include some psychology terms, but feel free to ignore the terms and just understand the ideas behind them. Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) are the two treatment modalities that helped change my life and many of my clients’ lives. The simplest way to explain CBT is that our thoughts affect our emotions and behavior, so if you can change your thoughts or learn to redirect them, you will feel better and will be able to change your behavior. DBT is a specific form of CBT that emphasizes acceptance of what cannot be changed.   

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the most commonly practiced forms of psychotherapy today. Its focus is on helping people learn how their thoughts color and can actually change their feelings and behaviors. It is usually time-limited and goal-focused as practiced by most psychotherapists in the U.S. today. DBT seeks to build upon the foundation of CBT, help enhance its effectiveness, and address specific concerns that the founder of DBT, psychologist Marsha Linehan, saw as deficits in CBT.

DBT emphasizes the psychosocial aspects of treatment — how a person interacts with others in different environments and relationships. The theory behind the approach is that some people are prone to react in a more intense and out-of-the-ordinary manner toward certain emotional situations — primarily those found in romantic, family, and friend relationships. DBT was originally designed to help treat people with borderline personality disorder, but is now used to treat a wide range of concerns.

The basic logic is that your thoughts affect your emotions and behavior. So, if you take the example of you looking at yourself in the mirror and thinking that you are fat and ugly, the associated emotions will be sadness, anxiety, and other negative emotions.

Now, let’s remember that you have the full control of your thoughts and the ability to redirect your thoughts to a more positive place. With this in mind, you will look at yourself in the mirror and tell yourself, “I am ugly, fat, and I have the worst sense of style…” Then look at yourself again, this time with love and compassion, and tell yourself that you are a beautiful, healthy looking individual who is doing the best you can in order to be happy (or any other positive things you want to say to yourself). How do you imagine you will feel telling yourself these positive things? I am hoping better than you feel when telling yourself that you are ugly and fat. This might take some time and practice, but once you learn how to redirect your thoughts to a more constructive place that helps change your behavior and drives you to a more desirable behavior, your will feel so much more happy and healthy. It’s not about lying to yourself, it’s about acknowledging your thoughts and redirecting them to a positive place.

Action # 5 : Reach Out For Professional Help

Should I look for a therapist near me for depression and anxiety?

Asking for help is not always easy, but there is nothing wrong with asking for support. Whenever possible, I suggest that you use whatever resources you have to get the support that you need. It might help you to know that there are over 43 million people in the U.S. suffering from anxiety (that’s 1 in 5 adults!!!). Unfortunately for many people, there is a stigma associated with seeking support for mental health, which prevents them from getting the support they need. Many also wait until things get worse, which makes it more challenging to treat. Seeking and finding the right therapist near you to help with your anxiety issues can also be anxiety-provoking, but it doesn’t have to be. Prior to finding the right therapist, you can educate yourself and find out the best treatment for anxiety. There are also self-help books that you can read to help you better understand what you are experiencing.

Are you wondering, “Is it time to find a therapist for depression and anxiety near me?” Then why not talk to someone? Why not make your life less anxious? Hold yourself accountable for asking for help. Especially in today’s fast-paced world, it’s entirely normal to feel stressed, worried, and anxious, but we don’t have to live this way.

Search for a therapist near you who treats anxiety, ask friends and family for a recommendation, and if you have any questions, please feel free to call us for a free consultation!  At LW Wellness, we help match you with the right therapist who fits your needs and provides you with the care and attention that you deserve.