3 Ways to Promote a Better Employer/Nanny Relationship

 

  1. Be united on all decisions.

Make sure you and your nanny have discussed rules and disciplinary procedures for your children and are on the same page. Never reprimand or contradict your nanny in front of your children! Not only does this diminish their authority from your child’s point of view, but it also shows your nanny you don’t respect her as a professional nor value her judgment. Parents and nannies need to play on the same team and support one another; consistency is key.

 

  1. Respect your nanny’s time off.

Remember that your nanny is also a person, with hobbies and interests, a social life and responsibilities other than the ones pertaining to your family. Be punctual when you say you will be home by a certain time and don’t inundate her phone with emails, voicemails or texts during her days off. Respect her personal space and property; don’t go look through her bag, car or (in the case of live-in caregivers) her bedroom.

 

  1. Show gratitude.

In 100 Simple Secrets of Successful People, David Niven states,“We work harder and better when we feel appreciated.” If your nanny feels her hard work is being acknowledged, she will be more likely to go the extra mile for you and your family. Something as simple as just saying “thank you” can go a long way when showing someone you appreciate all the work she does for your children to keep your household running smoothly. Random acts of kindness such as letting her leave (with full pay) on nights you get home early, or offering her the day off on her birthday are small ways you can show your nanny that you value the effort she puts into her job.

If you’re interested in more information about our services as they relate to your nanny, check out our nanny consulting page or contact us today.

Nanny’s First Day

It’s your nanny’s first day on the job; how can you ensure that things will run smoothly?

Just as with any job, your new nanny will need a few days of “orientation” in order to acclimate to her new position with your family. Ideally, she would be able to shadow you for a day and watch you perform the duties she will be responsible for going forward, but I realize it is not realistic for everyone to be able to take time off of work. Either way, taking a few hours to introduce the new nanny to the way you expect them to run your household will be mutually beneficial and help set the stage for a healthy working relationship and an open line of communication.

So what exactly do I need to show my nanny when they first start?

 First day orientation and job training may sound similar, but the concepts are actually quite different. When hiring your nanny, you should know what type of training they have previously had and, unless you have discussed this before, it shouldn’t be your responsibility to train them on childcare. It is, however, your responsibility to inform them about practices specific to working for you. For example, if you like your laundry washed and folded a certain way, you should give your new nanny detailed instructions about how this should be done, and where to put everything away. The same goes for any duties related to childcare. If, for instance, your child likes apples, but only when they have been skinned and cut into thin slices, make sure your nanny knows how to prepare snacks so that your child will want to eat them. In order for you to be happy with the work your nanny is doing, and in order for her to feel confident that she is meeting your needs as an employee, these needs must be clearly communicated from day one.

We suggest your nanny be able to shadow you for a day, just so you can show her exactly what the routine you want to be followed looks like. If shadowing isn’t an option, then making a list of daily activities and running through your preferences and expectations for each of them will suffice. Basically, you want to run through the tasks and responsibilities that your nanny will have to handle on a daily basis, giving her enough details that she will be able to anticipate what your needs are when she is making decisions. Remember, if you aren’t clear about what you want, you can’t expect your new nanny to be clear about it either. Don’t be afraid to give too many details, either. However, you should be aware of information overload, so make sure to write the really important things down, or suggest your nanny take notes on things like schedules, eating habits, etc.

If you’re interested in more information about our services as they relate to your nanny, check out our nanny consulting page or contact us today.

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The Nanny Search

So you know you need to hire a nanny, but where do you begin looking? 

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For many parents, the task of finding a childcare professional can be daunting, even if this isn’t your first time going through the process. For those of you who are new to parenting, or who have recently relocated to a new city and don’t yet have a network of people you trust who you can ask for advice, the prospect of locating, vetting, interviewing and then hiring a new nanny can seem near impossible.  Below are a few tried and true options families can use when approaching their search.

Reach out to friends:  The first place to start is asking friends, neighbors or other acquaintances you know who have children of a similar age, or that have had babysitters in the past. Ask them where they would recommend looking for a nanny, and if they have any suggestions for people they have used in the past that might be a good fit for your family. The best advertising is often through word-of-mouth!

Look within your community:  If you have just relocated to a new area, you may not know people you can ask yet. Or, perhaps your friends weren’t able to provide you with helpful answers.  Either way, your next step should be to reach out to people in your community to ask for advice. If you belong to a church, mosque or synagogue, many times nannies and babysitters will advertise their services there. You can also contact teachers and administrators at local schools to ask for guidance.  he more people you reach out to, the better chance you will have of finding exactly what you are looking for.

Use the internet:  Another great “first step” is always to perform an internet search. Search for terms like “childcare professionals in [your city],” and sift through the results you find. You may find local nanny agencies, ads from nannies looking for work on websites such as Craigslist or CareerBuilder or Mommy blogs that can give you guidelines and advice for how to navigate websites such as Care.com and GoNannies.com.

Whatever method you choose, the end result should be the same. We all want to have as many options as possible when selecting the person who will be caring for our children. The more avenues you have to search, the better your chance is of finding the perfect nanny for your family.  Happy hunting!

If you’re interested in more information about our services as they relate to your nanny, check out our nanny consulting page or contact us today.

Welcome!

Welcome to the Nanny Spy blog! I’m so excited to finally launch this project and bring parents here together to talk kids, nannies and everything in between. I’m a Mental Health Counselor, a wife and a mother of three girls. This site is the manifestation of years of experience, years of incredible struggles and my passion to help others on these all too familiar journeys.

 

When I had my first child, I started seeking support and guidance and didn’t know where to go. I grew up in Israel and lived in a kibbutz (communal settlement) for much of my adolescence, so I was used to community-based support. I wasn’t able to find any when it came to things like hiring a nanny for my child or just getting advice on services related to kids and families. Having worked as a nanny for many years, I was only familiar with the other side of it. The emotions you go through as a mother and the things you need to think about and know when it comes to choosing and having a relationship with a caregiver for your child can be overwhelming and confusing.

 

After working with individuals and groups for the past 10 years, I realized what I wanted to focus on is prevention of mental heal issues – starting with the family unit. By intervening with children and families early on and helping them find the right services, I hope to create a stronger foundation that will lead to a happier and healthier future.

 

This site, and my personal philosophy, is based on a study of wellness called The Five Ways to Wellbeing, which are Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Keep Learning and Give. I will be sharing weekly blogs on topics that range from general wellness practices, childcare philosophies, tips and tricks for hiring nannies, troubleshooting as it relates to childcare, communication practices and so much more!

 

My vision for this site is for it to be a forum where parents can find any related support for their children and families and also share their concerns and opinions with other parents. It’s a place for parents and professionals to connect in a healthy and productive format. As a young parent, I always felt I had to shop around for resources and a community of support. There wasn’t one place I could turn. It is my hope this site will become a one-stop shop for parents to be able to find support for their kids and family.

 

I invite you to take a look around the site to learn a little bit more about me and the services I provide. Feel free to leave comments with any questions and please let me know what topics you’d like to see covered. Also, be sure to follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram so can you stay up to date with the latest!

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